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Archive for the 'Field project' Category

Join Hugo and Bogdan to find out more about weather balloons. What are they? What do they measure?

Watch a short video of a balloon launch from Capel Dewi (Wales) here



Hugo with a weather balloon.
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Since today we are not launching weather balloons for the NAWDEX project, Hugo had some time to test other meteorological instruments installed at Capel Dewi. Today we are briefly introduce the SODAR (SOnic Detection and Ranging).

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SODAR at Capel Dewi.

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Hugo operating the SODAR at Capel Dewi.
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Today's episode focusses on the science behind the NAWDEX project as explained by special guest Prof. Geraint Vaughan from the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS).

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NAWDEX logo (via http://www.nawdex.ethz.ch/)
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Welcome to our first of hopefully daily updates on a project called NAWDEX, in which Hugo and Bogdan will be describing the day-to-day life during a field project. We aim to post daily updates on the science and practical aspects of field work.

NAWDEX (North Atlantic Waveguide and Downstream Impact Experiment) is an international project looking at the jet stream. One of it's aims to understand how diabatic processes (ie. heating and cooling) within clouds and how they affect the structure of the jet stream.

Today we will briefly introduce the project and who is taking part. Tomorrow we'll tell you about our first weather balloon launches. Please feel free to contact us, if you have any questions about the project or just weather in general.

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The mobile lab and weather balloon antenna at Capel Dewi
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Join Hugo, Richard and Geraint on a tropical island adventure where we discover the importance of ozone near the equator. We discuss how ozone is transported though the atmosphere and ask the question: "How do the towering storm clouds in the tropics affect the composition of the atmosphere?" We travelled halfway across the globe to Papua New Guinea with our weather balloons to gather the data that we needed to find out.

This was recorded in February 2014 during the Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics (CAST) campaign.

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Jennifer Muller chats to Will Morgan and Michelle Cain (@civiltalker), from the University of Cambridge, after the Royal Meteorological Society's Atmospheric Chemistry Special Interest Group meeting on "When the sun goes down: Atmospheric chemistry at night".

They discuss why atmospheric scientists are interested in what goes on at night, how that differs with the day and what their personal highlights were from the day/night. 

There is also some bonus discussion on geoengineering, where we find out that diamonds are a geoengineer's best friend.

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Gary Llyod reports on the INUPIAQ (Ice NUcleation ProcessInvestigation And Quantification) Project, which is based in the Swiss Alps, at the Jungfraujoch (3571m), Shilthorn (2970m) and Kleine Scheidegg (2061m) sites.

In this episode Gary talks to Dr Keith Bower from the Centre for Atmospheric Science at the University of Manchester about his role in the INUPIAQ campaign, James Bond, and the importance of upwind and downwind measurements. 

George Lazenby clearly isn't impressed by Gary's carrier bag.

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In this latest episode of the Barometer, Sam talks to Dr Matt Rigby from the School of Chemistry at the University of Bristol about the role that models will have to play in the GAUGE project.

As well as talking about a modeller’s wish list, Matt and Sam also talk about the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) network, and what exactly it is that modellers do whilst the instrument scientists are out getting the data.

 

To avoid confusion, this is not the kind of model that we are talking about. 

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In this episode of the Barometer, Sam catches up with Dr Hartmut Bösch, from the Earth Observation Science Group at the University of Leicester to discuss how satellites will be used during the GAUGE project.

Hartmut and Sam chat about the two main satellite instruments that will be used during GAUGE: the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on board the MetOp-A satellite, and the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), and also just generally extoll the beauty of remote sensing from space. 


The MetOp-A satellite; ain't she a beauty.
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In this episode of the Barometer, Jen catches up with Dr Grant Allen, from the Centre of Atmospheric Science at the University of Manchester,to discuss the airborne aspects of the GAUGE campaign.

As well as talking about how aircraft measurements from the UK's Atmospheric Research Aircraft will be used to help constrain emission estimates across the whole of the UK, Grant also talks about a potential dedicated flight campaign that encompasses the Northern conurbations of Leeds, Liverpool, and Manchester AKA the Robbie Fowler Triangle. 

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