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Archive for the 'Air pollution' Category

Will and Sam catch up with Andreas Petzold from Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany to talk about a program called IAGOS, which puts instruments on-board commercial aircraft to do routine measurements of the atmosphere. Join us to find out the benefits of such research and the important insights that we have gained from it.

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Sam and Will report back on day one of the Euro Geosciences Union 2014, the largest geosciences conference in Europe. As well as talking about some of the enjoyable sessions that have already taken place (unsurprisingly Will attended some talks on secondary organic aerosols), they catch up with Mathew Reeve and Will Ball from ClimateSnack.

ClimateSnack is an international and inter-disciplinary community where early career scientists interact in order to improve their writing and communication skills. For those of you lucky enough to be at this year’s EGU then come along to the town hall meeting on this Thursday (1st may) evening from 19:00 – 20:00 in Room R13 to hear all about how to better understand your audience.

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Recent UK Air Pollution

After an episode of poor air quality last week, Sam is joined by Will Morgan and Eoghan Darbyshire to chat about all things air pollution.

The conditions required for such UK air pollution events, the sources and the health impacts are all discussed. Was all the media hype justified? How often do these events occur? What's the outlook over the next few weeks? Find out by listening to this episode of the Barometer!

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Jennifer Muller chats to Will Morgan and Michelle Cain (@civiltalker), from the University of Cambridge, after the Royal Meteorological Society's Atmospheric Chemistry Special Interest Group meeting on "When the sun goes down: Atmospheric chemistry at night".

They discuss why atmospheric scientists are interested in what goes on at night, how that differs with the day and what their personal highlights were from the day/night. 

There is also some bonus discussion on geoengineering, where we find out that diamonds are a geoengineer's best friend.

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Will and Sam are joined by Dave Topping, who is also from the University of Manchester to discuss the day's events at the AGU Fall Meeting. We discuss a session on science communication, a subject close to all our hearts, how aerosols are affected by their viscosity and some work investigating greenhouse gas emissions from London.


View of the River Thames from the FAAM research aircraft. Photo by Will Morgan.
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Will and Sam are in high spirits to discuss Day 3, possibly because they finally got to hear James Hansen speak, potentially because they were feeling slightly sleep-deprived after 10 hours straight, and almost certainly because beer had once more been involved.

The reaction to the James Hansen talk is discussed in full, whilst Will also further cements his love of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOAs),and Sam reveals how he has still to deal with his lack of comfort around geologists.

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Will and Sam I meet up to discuss Day 2 of AGU, and begin by airing their disappointment at the cancellation of the ‘Frontiers of Geophysics’ lecture by ex-NASA Goddard chief James Hansen (thankfully this has now been rearranged for tomorrow). The dissatisfaction continues following a less-than-impressive defence, in one of the morning’s sessions, of a controversial recent study on the economic cost of a large release of Arctic methane.

Thankfully there are more positive things to be said about the Union Meeting, which this year focused on the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report. In this episode Will also gives a rather nifty description of the difference between organic and inorganic aerosols, and there is a debate about the judgement of using the ‘smoking causes lung-cancer’ argument as a parallel for the ‘humans cause climate-change’ dispute.

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Sam and Will are in giddy mood. Is it the jetlag, is it the beer, or is it just the excitement of being at one of the world’s premier conferences on Geophysical sciences?

Join them as they discuss the merits of being in San Francisco for the American Geophysical Union AKA AGU 2013. Will chats about short-lived climate forces and his favourite fires, whilst in an unexpected twist Sam elaborates on some of the satellite talks that he attended, including the proposed launch of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory Mark 2 (OCO-2).

Will in action, talking about his favourite fires.

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Will interviews Dave Fahey from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration about the role of black carbon aerosol in the climate system and the challenge of utilising one of the world's only fully autonomous research aircraft, the NASA Global Hawk. Dave also gives his insights on the publication of the IPCC Working Group 1 Summary for Policy Makers, having been a lead author of the 2007 report and an expert reviewer for the latest version.



Presenting: Will Morgan
Interviewee: Dave Fahey
Editing: Will Morgan
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redskyimage.jpgRed Sky at Night, Shepherd's Delight. Red Sky in the Morning, Shepherd's Warning.

Is this weather folklore true, or just another "myth" to be busted? And what could it mean? Listen to this mythbusting session to find out!As Sam points out in the episode, red skies get a mention in the Bible and also by Shakespeare! So could there be some truth to it? “Like a red morn that ever yet betokened, Wreck to the seaman, tempest to the field, Sorrow to the shepherds, woe unto the birds, Gusts and foul flaws to herdmen and to herds.” Venus and Adonis, Shakespeare. In the Bible, Jesus said, “When in evening, ye say, it will be fair weather: For the sky is red. And in the morning, it will be foul weather today; for the sky is red and lowering.” (Matthew XVI: 2-3,)Mythbuster: Sam Illingworth

Chat & production: Jennifer Muller



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